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MET Updates for 2019

In the decade since its launch, the MET has become an established multi-level test of English proficiency. While the test is useful for making decisions in social, educational, and workplace contexts, feedback from stakeholders and analysis of data suggests that the vast majority of test takers have educational/academic uses in mind.

With that in mind, in updating the MET, Michigan Language Assessment has introduced a new academic reading task to complement the multi-passage reading task, as well as introduce a higher proportion of items set in the educational domain throughout the test. These changes help to ensure that the test is even more fit-for-purpose than before, as well as making it useful for determining readiness for higher education. Additionally, the listening and reading sections of the test have been shortened to 50 items each, and the testing time for these sections reduced to 100 minutes total.

Apart from the above, the MET remains unchanged; it retains the same high quality materials and the same level of difficulty. The test continues to cover levels A2 to C1, with the most items targeted at the A2 to B2 levels.

The table below highlights the changes to the MET beginning in January 2019. You can also download this information: MET: 2019 Changes at a Glance.

MET: Changes for 2019

Test Section

MET (through December 2018)

MET from 2019

Listening Part 1
short conversation

    • 22 short conversations between two people
    • 1 question per conversation
  • 22 questions total
    • 19 short conversations between two people
    • 1 question per conversation
    • 19 questions total
  • increased proportion of conversations situated in the academic domain

Listening Part 2
longer conversation

    • 6 conversations between two people
    • 2–4 questions per conversation
  • 21 questions total
    • 4 conversations between two people
    • 2–4 questions per conversation
    • 14 questions total
  • increased proportion of conversations situated in the academic domain

Listening Part 3
short talk

    • 4 short talks
    • 3–5 questions per talk
  • 17 questions total
    • 4 short talks
    • 3–5 questions per talk
    • 17 questions total
  • increased proportion of conversations situated in the academic domain

Grammar

  • 25 questions testing a variety of grammar structures
    • 20 questions testing a variety of grammar structures
  • increased proportion will focus on academic topics

Reading
extended passage

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    • 2 extended reading passages about a range of general or academic topics
  • 5 questions each

Reading
3 thematically linked passages per set

    • 4 sets
  • 11–13 questions per set
    • 2 sets
  • 10 questions per set

Speaking 
Part 1, Task 1

  • test taker is asked to describe an illustration
  • The structure of the speaking test remains the same, but at least 2 of the 3 parts will focus on academic topics.

Speaking 
Part 1, Tasks 2 & 3

  • test taker answers two questions thematically related to the illustration from Task 1

Speaking
Part 2, Task 4

  • test taker explains the advantages and disadvantages about a situation

Speaking
Part 3, Task 5

  • test taker gives an opinion on a new topic and tries to convince the examiner to agree with the idea

Writing
Task 1

  • test taker answers three questions on a related theme using complete sentences
  • The structure of the writing test remains the same, but at least 1 task will focus on an academic topic.

Writing
Task 2

  • test taker writes a short essay of multiple paragraphs