MET Go!

Test Description

The MET Go! is a secure, multilevel exam that measures English language proficiency at the beginner to intermediate range of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR A1–B1). It is a four-skills exam consisting of reading, listening, and writing, with optional speaking. The test contains authentic tasks and situations that are suitable for teens, and MET Go! score reports provide individualized diagnostic feedback for each test taker.

Test Purpose

The MET Go! provides information about the English language ability of secondary-school aged EFL learners, with scores linked to the internationally recognized CEFR. Results may also be used to demonstrate the level of English proficiency for young learners intending to participate in travel-abroad programs.

Typical Test Taker

The typical MET Go! test taker is 11 to 15 years old and at the middle to lower-secondary school level. The test is aimed at those with proficiency levels from beginner basic user (CEFR A1) to intermediate independent user (CEFR B1).

Score Reporting

Each MET Go! test taker is awarded a personalized score report and an official certificate of achievement. All results are linked to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) to provide an internationally recognized level of ability.

Score Report

The score report includes details about test-taker accomplishments, including a separate CEFR-linked score for each skill section taken. Each test taker will also receive personalized recommendations on the back of their score report with activities and other ways they can improve certain skills. (See a sample of a personalized recommendation for a 3-skills score report, as well as for a 4-skills score report.)

Certificate

The MET Go! certificate is ideal for framing and displays the test taker’s name, date of test, sections taken, and the overall CEFR level achieved. The certificate also features the logos of both the University of Michigan and Cambridge Assessment English.

Format and Administration

The MET Go! is a paper-and-pencil test that takes about 90 minutes. An optional speaking section adds approximately 10 minutes.

Format of the MET Go! 

Section Duration Content
Listening 30 minutes 5 Parts
30 multiple-choice questions
Reading 30 minutes 2 Parts
30 multiple-choice questions
Writing 30 minutes 3 Parts
Handwritten test
Speaking (optional) 7–10 minutes 4 Parts
1 speaker, 1 examiner
Listening Section

Listening

The listening portion of the MET Go! takes 30 minutes and consists of five parts. There are a total of 30 multiple-choice questions. The recorded information is played twice.

The descriptors for these CEFR levels are as follows:

B1: Can understand straightforward factual information about common everyday or job related topics, identifying both general messages and specific details, provided speech is clearly articulated in a generally familiar accent. Can understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure etc., including short narratives.

A2: Can understand enough to be able to meet needs of a concrete type provided speech is clearly and slowly articulated. Can understand phrases and expressions related to areas of most immediate priority (e.g., very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment), provided speech is clearly and slowly articulated.

A1: Can follow speech that is very slow and carefully articulated, with long pauses for him/her to assimilate meaning. Can recognize concrete information (e.g,. places and times) on familiar topics encountered in everyday life, provided it is delivered in slow and clear speech.

(adapted from Council of Europe, 2001)

Format of the Listening Section

Type of Task

The listening section comprises 30 items in five parts:

Part 1: Identifying people in a picture based on short descriptions

Part 2: Answer/response items

Part 3: Answering questions about a short conversation using illustrations

Part 4: Longer conversation with multiple questions

Part 5: Short announcement with multiple questions

Format of the Items

Part 1

A picture with 6 to 8 people in a scene. Audio input consists of short sentences describing some of the people; the audio will be played twice.

Identification questions are printed in the test booklet. Students identify the person in the scene using a letter label.

Listening, Part 1 – Example

Look at the picture. Listen to some information. Find the person to answer the question.

Narrator: Benjamin is next to his mother. He is holding a toy car. Which person is Benjamin?


Part 2

The second part in listening consists of short questions with a choice of appropriate written responses. The questions are played twice.

Listening, Part 2 – Example

Speaker: What kind of snacks do you have?

The response choices are printed in the test booklet:

A. Everything is a dollar.
B. We have fruit and cookies.
C. They’re closed today.


Part 3

Part 3 contains a short dialogue followed by a question that has three picture options. The conversation is played twice.

Listening, Part 3 – Example

Girl: What did you get for lunch today, Anthony?

Boy: Well, I wanted a burger, but there weren’t any left, so I had pizza.

Girl: Oh, too bad. Maybe they’ll have some tomorrow.

The test taker will select the correct response from one of the three pictures printed in test booklet.

Narrator: What did the boy eat?


Part 4

In the fourth part of the listening section, the test taker will hear a conversation followed by multiple questions. An accompanying graphic related to the conversation sets the scene. The conversation and questions are played twice.

Listening, Part 4 – Example

Boy: Hi Hannah. How is everything?

Girl: Everything’s great. I haven’t seen YOU around lately.

Boy: Yeah, I went to visit my grandparents for a couple of weeks. It was fun.

Girl: Where do your grandparents live?

Boy: They live in the mountains, close to a big lake. There is a LOT to do there—I went hiking, swimming, fishing… but my favorite thing was spending time with my cousins.

Girl: That sounds like a lot of fun!

Boy: It was. I can’t wait to go back.

The questions and the options are printed in the test booklet:

What are the speakers talking about?

A. the boy’s hobbies
B. the boy’s recent trip
C. the boy’s plan for next week


Part 5

A short announcement or message is followed by multiple questions. An accompanying graphic related to the conversation sets the scene. Each announcement will be played twice.

Listening, Part 5 – Example

Woman: It’s almost time to leave for our field trip. As you know, today we’re going to a furniture factory. We will watch furniture—like tables, chairs, and desks—be made. When we get back to school, I want you to write a report. In it you should describe what you saw at the factory. You can write about the machines and what the workers were doing. OK, please make a line by the door. The bus we’ll take to the factory will be arriving in just a couple minutes.

The question and options are printed in the test booklet:

What is the woman mostly talking about?

A. new classroom furniture
B. something she saw on a trip
C. today’s class activity

Evaluation of the MET Go! Listening Section

Listening is scored automatically by computer. There is only one correct answer for each item. Correct answers receive one point. Incorrect answers receive zero.

Reading Section

Reading

Format of the Reading Section

The reading section takes 30 minutes and contains two parts. There are a total of 30 multiple-choice questions in this section.

Part 1 consists of a group of independent gap-fill grammar and vocabulary items on a single theme. The theme is supported by a related graphic.

Part 2 contains informational and narrative texts.

The descriptors for these CEFR levels are as follows:

B1: Can read straightforward factual texts on subjects related to his/her field and interests with a satisfactory level of comprehension.

A2: Can understand short, simple texts on familiar matters of a concrete type which consist of high frequency everyday or job-related language. Can understand short, simple texts containing the highest frequency vocabulary, including a proportion of shared international vocabulary items.

A1: Can understand very short, simple texts.

(adapted from Council of Europe, 2001)


Format of the Items

Part 1

A group of independent gap-fill grammar and vocabulary items on a single theme. Theme is supported by a related graphic. There are two separate thematic sets, with 16 questions in total.

Reading, Part 1 – Example

After school, students are allowed to use the basketballs and other _______ in the gym.

A. instruments
B. sports
C. equipment

Gym class _______ 3 times a week for 60 minutes.

A. meets
B. meet
C. meeting


Part 2

The second part contains short texts with multiple questions per passage. These are narrative and informational texts. The first two texts are brochures, emails, advertisements, announcements, or other similar materials. The second two texts are short narrative stories.

Reading, Part 2 – Example 1

What is the text mostly about?

A. buying a new camera
B. having pictures taken at school
C. taking a class about photography

What must students bring on September 4?

A. their cameras
B. some money
C. their ID cards


Reading, Part 2 – Example 2

What is the story mostly about?

A. a festival in Maplewood City
B. people who live in Maplewood City
C. the history of Maplewood City

In the last sentence of paragraph 1, what does there mean?

A. at a restaurant
B. at a festival
C. at a park


Evaluation of the MET Go! Reading Section

The reading section is scored automatically by computer. There is only one correct answer for each item. Correct answers receive one point. Incorrect answers receive zero.

Writing Section

Writing

Format of the Writing Section

The MET Go! writing section consists of three parts and includes detailed illustrations. It is designed to evaluate the ability of a test taker to describe a sequential narration of familiar events and to write about a personal experience, including supporting details. Additionally, it evaluates the ability of the test taker to express a preference or opinion, express ideas using a range of appropriate vocabulary, use the appropriate cohesive devices to create a logical progression of ideas, and use correct conventions for spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.

The descriptors for these CEFR levels are as follows:

B1: Can write straightforward connected texts on a range of familiar subjects within his/her field of interest, by linking a series of shorter discrete elements into a linear sequence.

A2: Can write a series of simple phrases and sentences linked with simple connectors like “and,” “but,” and “because.” Can give information in writing about matters of personal relevance (e.g., likes and dislikes, family, pets) using simple words and basic expressions.

A1: Can write simple isolated phrases and sentences.

(adapted from Council of Europe, 2001)

Format of the tasks

Part 1

The first part asks test takers to tell a story based on a comic strip illustration. They are asked to write three to four sentences (20–35 words) of descriptive or narrative text.

Writing, Part 1 – Example

Look at the three pictures. Write about this story. Write 20 words or more.


Part 2

The second part asks the test taker to describe a personal experience in response to a set of question prompts.

Writing, Part 2 – Example

Write about a school trip that you took.

  • Where did you go on a school trip?
  • When did you go?
  • What did you like about the school trip? Why?
  • Include more details. Write at least one paragraph.

Part 3

Part 3 asks the test taker to write about a personal preference or opinion in response to a prompt.

Writing, Part 3 – Example

Read and answer the question below. Write at least 2 paragraphs.

Some people like to travel in a car. Other people prefer to take the bus.

How do you prefer to travel?

Explain your answer.


Evaluation of the MET Writing Section

The test taker’s writing performance is evaluated by certified Michigan Language Assessment raters using a rating tool. The criteria used are as follows:

  • Task completion
  • Cohesion
  • Grammar
  • Vocabulary
  • Mechanics
Speaking Section

Speaking

The descriptors for these CEFR levels are as follows:

B1: Can reasonably fluently sustain a straightforward description of one of a variety of subjects within his/her field of interest, presenting it as a linear sequence of points.

A2: Can give a simple description or presentation of people, living or working conditions, daily routines, likes/dislikes, etcetera, as a short series of simple phrases and sentences linked into a list.

A1: Can produce simple mainly isolated phrases about people and places.

(adapted from Council of Europe, 2001)

Format of the Speaking Section

The speaking section is an optional 7- to 10-minute section comprised of four parts and three rated tasks.

Part 1: Warm-up. The examiner and test taker engage in a short conversation.

Part 2: The examiner asks the test taker to compare pictures.

Part 3: The examiner asks the test taker to describe a picture.

Part 4: The examiner asks the test taker questions about their experiences and preferences.

These parts are designed to allow the test taker to:

  • Convey information about a picture using general vocabulary
  • Describe a picture and narrate a sequence of events
  • Talk about a personal experience
  • State a personal preference and add detail to explain/support

Format of the tasks

Part 1: Warm-Up

The warm-up consists of simple questions and responses in which the examiner asks some simple personal questions. This part takes about 60 seconds.

Speaking, Part 1 – Example

What is your name?

How is the weather today?

Tell me about your family.


Part 2: Picture Comparison

This part contains two nearly identical illustrations with a few differing details. Test takers are asked to describe the differences found in the two images. This part takes about 90 seconds.

Speaking, Part 2 – Example

Look at the two pictures. Many things are the same, but some things are different.

For example, in both pictures there is a store. But in picture 1, there are two people outside the store, and in picture 2, there are not.

What else is different? Say as much as you can.


Part 3: Picture Description and Story

Part 3 shows the test taker a picture prompt with multiple people in a setting familiar to teens. They are asked to describe the picture and tell a story about the activity taking place in the picture.

This part takes about 60 seconds.

Speaking, Part 3 – Example

Tell me what you see in the picture and tell me a story about it. Say as much as you can. You have 60 seconds.


Part 4: Personal Experience / Opinion

The examiner reads a prompt on a theme related to the activity or scene shown in the illustration for Part 3. In the first task, the test taker describes a personal experience relating to a specific topic or setting. For the second task, the test taker is then asked to express an opinion and give reasons to support it.

The tasks will take about 60 seconds each.

Speaking, Part 4 – Example

Task 1

Tell me about a time in the past when you had to clean or wash something in your home. You have 10 seconds to plan your answer. (…) Now you have 60 seconds to speak. Say as much as you can. Please begin.

Task 2

Some people enjoy cleaning and organizing their homes. Other people think cleaning is boring and don’t like to do it. How do you feel about cleaning? Give your opinion and reasons to support it. You have 10 seconds to plan your answer. (…) Now you have 60 seconds to speak. Say as much as you can. Please begin.


Evaluation of the MET Go! Speaking Section

Trained speaking examiners will rate the speaking test using a rating tool. They will use the following criteria:

  • Task completion
  • Linguistic resources (range and accuracy of vocabulary and grammar)
  • Intelligibility (delivery and clarity of message)