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MET Sample Tests

This sample test reflects the updates to the MET that begin in 2019. These changes include:

  • a new academic reading task to complement the multi-passage reading task
  • a higher proportion of items set in the educational domain
  • listening and reading sections shortened to 50 items each
  • reduced testing time for listening and reading (now 100 minutes total)

Although the sample test is designed to be similar in difficulty to the MET and will give you a reasonable idea of how you should expect to score on the exam, there is no guarantee that your CEFR level on the sample test will be the same as the CEFR level indicated by scaled scores you receive after you take the test.


Listening, Reading and Grammar

Listening, Reading and Grammar

Preparation

Before taking the listening and reading and grammar sections of the MET (2019) Sample Test, you will need the following:

  • the test booklet, audio files (parts 1, 2, and 3), and the answer sheet
  • a pen or pencil
  • 100 minutes of uninterrupted time
  • a timing device, such as a clock or stopwatch
  • a device on which to play the listening section audio

Instructions

Listening Section

Look at the test booklet as you listen to the instructions and the questions. After each question, there is a pause so that you can mark your answers on the answer sheet. Do not pause the recording after each question. By using the time permitted on the recording, you will get practice listening and responding in a set amount of time. This listening section takes about 35 minutes.

Reading and Grammar Section

Read the instructions, then allow yourself 65 minutes to mark your answers to the reading section questions.

Sample Test Materials

Listening Section Audio

Interpreting your Scores

Interpreting your Listening and Reading and Grammar Scores

When the MET is taken under examination conditions, the listening and reading and grammar sections are scored by computer using Item Response Theory (IRT) to arrive at scaled scores. This method ensures that the language ability required to receive a scaled score remains the same from year to year and that scores are comparable.

IRT-based scaled scores are not the same as number-right scores or percentage scores, but there is a very high correlation between the number of correct answers provided and the IRT-based scaled scores.

Calculate Your Scores

After you have finished taking the listening and reading and grammar sections of the MET sample test, follow these instructions to calculate your scores:

  • Check your answers using the scoring key.
  • If your answer matches the answer key, then award yourself one point. If your answer does not match the answer key do not award yourself a point.
  • Add up all of your correct answers for the listening section. This is your listening section score.
  • Add up all of your correct answers for the reading section. This is your reading section score.

Interpreting Your Listening Scores

  • Scores 44 and above: If you have strictly followed the instructions for taking the sample test, you are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to CEFR level C1.
  • Scores 32–43: You are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to CEFR level B2.
  • Scores 17–31: You are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to CEFR level B1.
  • Scores 11–16: You are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to CEFR level A2.
  • Scores 10 or below: You are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to below A2 on the CEFR. You may benefit from more lessons or more practice before you register for the examination.

Interpreting Your Reading and Grammar Scores

  • Scores 45 and above: If you have strictly followed the instructions for taking the sample test, you are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to CEFR level C1.
  • Scores 37–44: You are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to CEFR level B2.
  • Scores 22–36: You are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to CEFR level B1.
  • Scores 15–21: You are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to CEFR level A2.
  • Scores 14 or below: You are likely to receive a scaled score that corresponds to below A2 on the CEFR. You may benefit from more lessons or more practice before you register for the examination.

Speaking

Speaking

The MET Speaking Test measures an individual’s ability to produce comprehensible speech in response to a range of tasks and topics. It is a structured, one-on-one interaction between examiner and test taker that includes five distinct tasks. The tasks require test takers to convey information about a picture and about themselves, give a supported opinion, and state the advantages and disadvantages of a particular proposal.

MET sample speaking prompt

Watch a complete MET Speaking Test

Writing

Writing

The MET Writing Test is designed to evaluate the ability to write in English. The test is intended for English language learners who range in ability from the high beginner to low advanced levels. In order to measure the writing proficiency of individuals at these differing levels of ability, the MET Writing Test requires test takers to produce written language at the sentence level, the paragraph level, and to produce a short essay.